Forum

Notifications
Clear all

Double Blind Vs Single blind Study

Page 5 / 5
ama224
(@ama224)
Trusted Member Registered

I believe that the biggest difference between single or double-blind studies is the psychology behind it. Depending on the situation it may be useful to conduct one as opposed to the other. In the specific example given I don't think it makes a difference if it's single or double because the situation at hand is an Alzheimer's case where a condition is meant to be treated as opposed to some sort of pain sought to be cured. As Dr. Simon mentioned in his lecture video that the majority of pain is actually mental. This idea kinda goes with the different studies too. Where mentally not knowing the outcome allows both the proctor and subject to seek positive outcomes. 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/10/2021 12:59 am
cm539
(@cassiem)
Trusted Member Registered

As many here have said, a double blind study eliminates the chances of a biased experiment. For this reason, I believe that double blind is better than single blind or unblinded experiments. Let's consider the Alzheimer's example you have provided in a single blind scenario. As the investigator studies the patient, they may begin to “see” improvements but in reality, their true vision is blocked. It's almost as if they will unintentionally skew the data subconsciously. As a result, it is possible this new drug could be released before is ready. If this were a double blind experiment, the investigator would not have any biased opinions and the outcome would be more reliable.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/10/2021 1:30 pm
Naglaa Hemida
(@naglaa-hemida)
Trusted Member Registered

In my point of view, double-blind studies are more accurate since they provide a valid baseline for the experiment. The lecture used the double-blind multi-center research as an example. Dr. Simon demonstrates how a doctor's competency influenced the study, and because it was a multi-center, double-blind trial, you can argue that the baselines were all fairly similar because patient and surgeon bias was removed in this case. If this trial were single-blind, the surgeon bias would have to be taken into consideration, and the statistical significance of comparing several locations would be reduced. Applying the same logic to the Alzheimer's disease example, if any of the investigators have a financial incentive for the drug to succeed, this could introduce bias into the study that would not exist if it was conducted under double-blind conditions and the investigators were unaware of the placebo vs. experimental dose.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/10/2021 7:43 pm
Rifath Hasan
(@rifath-hasan)
Member

Double-blind studies mean neither the experimenter nor the participant has any clue about the study or treatment. That helps to get the best possible results out of the experiment. Since the experimenter is also clueless about who is receiving the actual treatment, they are less likely to accidentally reveal subtle clues that might influence the outcome of the research. In addition to that, the person responsible for data collection sometimes has subjective feelings and biases that might have an influence on how the subjects respond or how the data is collected. In the Alzheimer's disease example, any of the experimenter's inclination towards any subject or monetary rewards may have an effect on the final output. Therefore, till now double-blind experiments are far better and safe than single-blind ones. 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 24/10/2021 10:34 pm
nk123
(@nuran-kavakli)
Eminent Member Registered

Double-blind versus single-blind is a debate around influence and bias. It is extremely easy for the doctor to have an unwanted bias towards a certain patient that is given the drug vs the placebo. In the example, the research group developed the drug and is hoping that it works. Because the researchers want the drug to succeed, they could have different influences that could alter the results. They could be nicer to the patient with the drug, or just provide them with more necessities.  Double-blind clears the way for any type of bias. Doctors act the same way towards everyone because they do not know who was given what drug.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 27/10/2021 1:46 am
mcr29
(@mrela13)
Eminent Member Registered

A double blind study has a lot of benefits in clinical trials where the people running the study want every part of the study to be impartial. I think most can agree that if a single blind study is complete it allows the investigator to determine if the drug is really working or if the patient is just feeling a placebo affect. Like there being benefit to a single blind study, a double blind study allows for the investigator to record results without being partial to a specific person or trait. For example, in my company we have a meeting every year on unconscious bias. This is essentially when you have feelings are preferences to something without realizing it. This could be a bias towards certain genders, the way people look, or many other biases. These biases may have an impact on a study or may influence who is chosen for a study to make it more likely to pass or more likely to do better for a certain group. By doing a double blind study, any bias or preferences that may come up are taken out of the equation and make the study more accurate with more acceptable results.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 10/12/2021 7:51 pm
nmcbean
(@nmcbean)
Eminent Member Registered

A double-blind study increases the reliability of the research conducted. It ensures that doctors are not manipulating results in any way. They also make it easier to duplicate the study. For studies that suggest a relatively new treatment, for instance, a double-blind study eliminates potential bias. This way, new medical devices/products are not misleading consumers.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 29/03/2022 3:07 pm
Alexia Coffer
(@alexia-coffer)
Eminent Member Registered

Blinding covers any of the numerous participants of the clinical trial, e.g., researchers, subjects, technicians, and data analysts. Single-, double-, and triple-blinding are commonly used blinding strategies in clinical research. A single-blind study masks the subjects from knowing which study treatment, if any, they are receiving. A double-blind study blinds both the subjects as well as the researchers to the treatment allocation. Triple-blinding involves withholding this information from the patients, researchers, as well as data analysts. Randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trials involve the random placement of participants into two groups; an experimental group that receives the investigational treatment and a control group that acquires a placebo. Neither the researchers nor the study subjects know who is getting the experimental treatment and who is getting a placebo. This type of clinical study ranks as the gold standard for the validation of treatment interventions. Unfortunately, blinding is not possible to achieve in all clinical trials. For example, the method of drug delivery may not be amenable to blinding. An excellent clinical protocol may help ensure that within the ethical and practical constraints, blinding is achieved as effectively as possible. Bias refers to a deviation from the truth in the collection, analysis, interpretation, or publication of data, leading to false conclusions. Poor blinding of a clinical research study may lead to bias that may result in inflated effect size and increase the risk of type I error. Even a small error in blinding may lead to a statistically significant result without any real difference between the study groups. Keeping both the researchers and the subjects blinded to treatment allows a double-blinded study to prevent the researchers from treating the study groups differently. The double-blinded study minimizes the risk of various types of biases, such as observer bias or confirmation bias, which may influence the results of the investigation. It may also help avoid a disproportionately large placebo effect in the patients involved in the study. Unblinding may occur during any portion of the blinded clinical trial. Unblinding that occurs before the conclusion of a trial may be a source of bias that the study should document and report. It is the responsibility of all the healthcare professionals involved in a clinical trial, such as physicians, nurses, pharmacists, technicians, and data analysts, to maintain blinding as effectively as possible during the trial and to report any premature unblinding. Double blind seems to be more effective due to it not being misleading, ambiguous, uninformaitve and inadequate. 

ReplyQuote
Posted : 02/04/2022 11:01 am
alexbryant-harden
(@alexbryant-harden)
Eminent Member Registered

I believe that double-blind studies are beneficial. This is due to the fact that a researcher or overseer of the patient could have an impact on the patient if they know what is given. If the researcher develops a rapport or connection with a patient this could bias or sway them to want to give the actual drug to the patient which is unethical. The double-blind study allows the entire study to be without bias.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 02/04/2022 9:46 pm
Ayomide.O
(@ayomide-o)
Eminent Member Registered

Double-blind trials make for a more accurate and less biased study. In a double-blind study, the information of which treatment was given to whom is withheld from both the participants and the experimenters. The reason that I think this is a better and more reliable method than a single-blind trial is that it will take away any potential for experimenter bias or power of suggestion when conducting the study (for example the experimenter can inadvertently persuade the subject that received the treatment that they should be feeling better and dissuade the subject that received the placebo). Also In terms of bias, the experimenter could unconsciously bias the interpretation of their results since they know who received what treatment or even be biased in the assignment process. This method of ensuring an unbiased study is extremely necessary in many cases.

ReplyQuote
Posted : 03/04/2022 10:46 am
Page 5 / 5
Share: