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Design Output

hodafattel
(@hodafattel)
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In lecture this week, it was mentioned that in the design control there should always be a Design Input Document (DID), but only some companies not all have a Design Output. In my opinion, every input needs an output, so this is a little bit unclear to me. Can you give an example of when that occurs? 

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Topic starter Posted : 27/10/2021 1:33 pm
jaf22
(@jaf22)
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Not all design inputs are necessarily related to some performance output. For some requirements such as color or force, there is an output that can be related to manufacturing or test related value. For some inputs such as ones based for end user validation such as "device works as intended" or "surgeon is able to manipulate instrument with ease", the validation of the device is binary which is either a yes or no. There is no output as there isn't a specific color, force, or rationale for the input that is chosen based on whim of the end user. 

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Posted : 27/10/2021 9:47 pm
cm539
(@cassiem)
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All inputs have outputs, but I believe your confusion may be arising from the document name. There is an input document, an output document, and a design specification document (DSD). From my understanding, the input and output documents are the two parts that come together to form an additional document: the DSD. A company can omit the output document because the outputs are included in the DSD. It is a bit redundant to include each input and output twice, but I believe the DSD provides a convenience to the reader so that each variable is in one location.

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Posted : 28/10/2021 3:11 pm
ps689
(@ps689)
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I agree that although there isn’t a document that explicitly states a design output, it doesn’t mean that the design doesn’t have an output. The design input provides a general overview of what your product will look like and how it will function. The design specification gives the specifications of what exactly those inputs that the user or customer required—for example, the example that Dr. Simon has given was with the knob: red would be your input and a specific dye of red would be your specifications. There are also the design verifications that confirm that the output of your design meets whatever was stated in your design inputs. So, although there isn’t a specific design output document, your end product is being tested and documented to ensure they meet design input and specifications.  

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Posted : 31/10/2021 9:44 pm
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